What is the Forrestfield North project and what has happened so far?

In 2014, the State Government confirmed the Forrestfield-Airport Link project, inclusive of a new rail line to Perth Airport and a train station in Forrestfield North near High Wycombe. With the proposed development of a new rail line and train station, the City and key State Government Agencies including the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) identified the need to redefine the potential land uses surrounding the future station, focussing on mixed use development incorporating retail, commercial and higher density residential.

In September 2015, the City adopted the Forrestfield North District Structure Plan (DSP), which set a vision and planning framework for development surrounding the future train station. The District Structure Plan was approved by the WAPC in September 2016. View the District Structure Plan here.

The long term strategic planning vision for the area as set out in the District Structure Plan is to create an attractive, vibrant and sustainable urban setting within a landscaped context, focused on medium and high density housing with local employment opportunities. Future development of the area will include:

  • a new activity centre with shopping opportunities and other services to meet the needs of an expanding local population (referred to as Forrestfield North – Activity Centre Precinct); and
  • a new commercially focused Transit Oriented Development (TOD) (link to technical questions below) precinct based around the new train station (referred to as Forrestfield North – TOD Precinct)
  • a residential precinct (referred to as Forrestfield North – Residential Precinct)

Since early 2017 the City, with the assistance of Planning Consultant Element (previously TPG + Place Match), have been preparing detailed planning for the above precincts. It is noted that the three (3) precincts have been consolidated into two (2) to account for efficiencies and synergies associated with the structure plan preparation process.

The City of Kalamunda undertook public consultation on what landowners and community members thought was important for the Local Structure Plans in 2017. Key outcomes of this engagement process included a desire from the community for a family-oriented and natural vibe, to celebrate creeks and streams, recreation and bushland living in design and provide sporting facilities and open green spaces that are lacking in the area.

Development of the draft Local Structure Plan (LSP) for the Residential Precinct is now complete and on 30 April 2018 was approved by Council for the purpose of advertising.

The City of Kalamunda is now seeking community feedback on the draft Local Structure Plan.

What is the next step for the Forrestfield North project?

Once the public advertising period for the Local Structure Plan has concluded at 5pm, Monday 2 July 2018, the City and its team of expert consultants are required to consider submissions received, and finalise the Local Structure Plan having regard to these submissions. The feedback will then be provided to a Council Briefing Meeting for consideration and an Ordinary Council Meeting for making a decision on whether to adopt the finalised Local Structure Plan with or without modification. It is currently anticipated that the final Local Structure Plan will be presented to Council in September 2018.

Following Council’s adoption of the Local Structure Plan, the City is required to prepare a report and recommendation to the Western Australian Planning Commission (WAPC) for a final decision. The WAPC is generally expected to make its decision within 120 days of receipt of the Local Structure Plan.

Further information on the statutory decision making process for Local Structure Plans is outlined in the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015.

Why is community consultation being undertaken?

The City of Kalamunda has worked with the community since the beginning of the Forrestfield North project to ensure the principles and objectives of the planning for the area appropriately reflect the needs and desires of the community. The City is also required to advertise the Local Structure Plan under the Planning and Development (Local Planning Schemes) Regulations 2015 in a number of different ways.

The community’s ongoing feedback, particularly during this advertising period, is imperative as it will guide the final development of the Local Structure Plan and ultimately the coordination and implementation of subdivision and development within the Residential Precinct

Why is the draft Local Structure Plan for the Residential Precinct being delivered separately to the TOD precinct?

The previous State Government’s plan for the Forrestfield Train Station, was for a bay 2500 carpark at ground level and a bus interchange. The current State Government under the direction of the Minister of Transport, Planning and Lands, Ms Saffioti, have decided to revisit the carpark and explore the option of a multi-storey carpark with the potential for commercial opportunities. 

The State Government is currently undertaking further investigations to explore these opportunities. The completion of the TOD Precinct plan is dependent on the outcomes of this analysis, as this is an essential component of the TOD Precinct.


When will the draft TOD Precinct be released?

The State Government has not indicated the timeframe for the completion of the further analysis of the Train Station Precinct and therefore it is difficult to put a timeframe on the release of the draft. The project team has, however, done a significant amount of work on the Train Station Precinct to date.

I live or own a property within the project area - how will my property be impacted?

The draft Local Structure Plans inform detailed planning and provide guidance on key future development and subdivision potential, including commercial development potential and land requirements for road reserves, essential services provision (power, water, sewer etc), community infrastructure and public open space. Refer to the draft Local Structure Plan (located in the documents library) to identify the proposed future land use of your property.


I live within the project area - how will the value of my property be impacted?

There are many factors such as market conditions, site amenity, cost of servicing, lot size, existing structures, and subdivision potential which can influence property value.

The City of Kalamunda recommends land owners seek expert advice in relation to property values.

I live or own a property within the project area - will my rates go up?

Rates in Western Australia are principally based on Gross Rental Values (GRV) which are assessed every four (4) years by the Valuer-General. The GRV is influenced by factors relevant to the buildings on the property together with the facilities and services available in the area generally such as community and recreation facilities, shops and transport infrastructure. It is possible that the GRV may change over time during the ongoing development and subdivision of the Local Structure Plan (LSP) area. Naturally this may result in a proportional change to the rates payable (i.e. rents will increase because of amenities).

In the event that a landowner chooses to demolish existing buildings on their land, the calculation on rates applicable is based on a vacant land valuation. This may attract a higher rate as a result of the change in classification through the finalisation of the LSP. 

Rates are based on a property’s value; if the value changes then the rates payable will proportionally change.


Do I have to sell or develop my land?

If your property has been identified as Local Open Space, Road Reservation or Community Purpose there will at some stage be the requirement for the portion of your land that is identified as one of these items to be purchased for that particular purpose through the relevant purchasing mechanism (i.e. Development Contributions Plan). This process occurs at the time the infrastructure is required and are generally facilitated through negotiation. The timeframes around when these transfers will be required are not certain as it will depend on a need arising from the pattern and staging of development/subdivision in the area together with funds being available and committed through a future Development Contribution Scheme.

For properties outside of the abovementioned classifications, there is no obligation to sell or develop your land.


My land is identified for Local Open Space, Road Reservation or Community Purpose - what does this mean?

Land that is identified as Local Open Space, Road Reservation or Community Purpose is proposed to be purchased through the future Development Contribution Plan (DCP) that will support infrastructure delivery within the project area. DCPs are administered by the City under provisions of the City’s Local Planning Scheme No. 3. DCPs facilitate the contribution of funds from the development and subdivision of land in the area to undertake land acquisitions and fund public infrastructure that service the broader project area. As development progressively occurs, funds are raised through the DCP. The schedule of items requiring purchase and timing of acquisition or delivery is dependent on the take up of development, infrastructure demands and availability of funds within the DCP.

Will I get fair value for the land acquisition?

At the time of acquisition, an independent land valuer will undertake a valuation of the portion of land to be acquired. If you do not agree or are unhappy with the value provided, you have the opportunity to consult a land valuer of your own to undertake a separate valuation. If the two valuations are different the two valuers will meet and attempt come to an agreement on land value. The particulars of this process will be further explained within the DCP.


What if I want the land to be acquired sooner rather than wait for the DCP funds to be in place?

The City may only acquire land through the Development Contribution Plan when funds are available and the demand for that infrastructure has arisen. For some key infrastructure items such as major road connections, sewerage and high amenity or functional local open space which are critical for the development to occur, the City may consider forward or pre-funding these acquisitions / infrastructure items. This is a detailed consideration for Council as the area develops.


My land is identified for Environmental Conservation or Bush Forever, what does this mean?

Land containing species and communities of significant environmental value are required to be retained under the direction of preliminary environmental advice received by the State Government. Land identified for environmental conservation does not currently have a defined process or commitment to be purchased.

Environmental Conservation may be purchased through a third party acquisition (i.e. for an environmental offset requirement). There are known major developments in the locality including the future development of Perth Airport and the Forrestfield Airport Link that may require offsets of this specific environmental type. The City will continue to explore the potential for these developments to acquire parts of the conservation areas as offsets if required.

While the above does not provide landowners affected by conservation any certainty with regard to the timing of potential purchase, the advertising of the LSP will facilitate the necessary discussions with the State Government and other relevant stakeholders. This process will assist with defining and identifying the appropriate process for these conservation areas.


My land is identified as Public Purpose – Primary School, what does this mean?

The Local Structure Plan (LSP) proposes to provide a government primary school site within its boundaries. This requirement for a primary school has been confirmed with the Department of Education as part of preliminary engagement undertaken throughout preparation of the LSP and is based on the projected development potential of the broader District Structure Plan area. The Primary School site will ultimately be purchased by the State Government through a separate process which is reliant on the progression of the LSP. 

My land is identified for light industrial, what does this mean?

Land identified as light industry has a proposed clause in which the portion of the lot fronting Sultana Road West must comply with the light industry zoning of the Local Planning Scheme and the rear portion is to have a single house, making it a ‘composite’ use. The purpose of the ‘composite’ use is to provide an appropriate interface and transition from the Forrestfield/High Wycombe Industrial Area to the south of the Local Structure Plan, to the residential portion of the Forrestfield North Residential Precinct.


My land is identified as Residential – R60, what does this mean?

Land identified as Residential – R60 can be developed in accordance with the provisions for R60 outlined in State Planning Policy 3.1 Residential Design Codes. Private and Public Realm Design Guidelines are in the process of development and will be completed during the finalisation of the Local Structure Plan. R60 developments comprised the following typical building typologies:

·  Unit style single houses with lot sizes typically around or above 150sqm;

·  two-storey town house with lot sizes typically around 150sqm;

·  Two-three storey apartments (multiple dwellings).

An example of the abovementioned building typologies are provided in the below illustration and photograph.

Transect of single houses and two/three storey units and apartments (Source: Design WA)



My land is identified as Residential – R80, what does this mean?

Land identified as Residential – R80 can be developed in accordance with the provisions for R80 outlined in State Planning Policy 3.1 Residential Design Codes. R80 development are typically comprises:

·  Two/three-storey town house with lot sizes typically around 120sqm;

·  Three/four storey apartments (multiple dwellings).

An example of the abovementioned building typologies are provided in the below illustration and photographs.

Transect of single houses and three/four storey units and apartments (Source: Design WA)



My land is identified as Residential – R100, what does this mean?

Land identified as Residential – R100 can be developed in accordance with the provisions for R100 outlined in State Planning Policy 3.1 Residential Design Codes. R100 developments are typically 3-4 storey apartments. An example of this building typology is provided in the below photographs.


The District Structure Plan identified the location of a fly-over Roe Highway bridge connecting Sultana Road West with Sultana Road East, why has the location changed?

The proposed location of the fly-over bridge identified in the Local Structure Plan has been chosen for the following reasons:

·  The bridge landing to the east will have significant impact on multiple residential properties on the southern side of Sultana Road East, requiring significant land resumption and demolition of existing infrastructure.

·  The bridge landing to the west will have impact on the properties to the south of Sultana Road West, requiring land resumption.

·  The proposed bridge location will have less impact on existing infrastructure and land resumption.

·  The proposed bridge location is more centralised for the broader catchment, located centrally between Maida Vale Road and Berkshire Road.

·  The proposed bridge location is located more centrally to the Forrestfield North Residential Precinct, allowing greater function of the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Boulevard.

·  Land on the southern side of Sultana Road West is zoned industrial. By having the TOD Connector running along Sultana Road West it would encourage industrial traffic to enter the residential precinct. By having the TOD Connector Boulevard centralised it will keep industrial traffic confined to the industrial precinct. 

Why have the Public Realm Design Guidelines, Development Contribution Plan, Private Realm Design Guidelines, Land Assembly Strategy and the Sustainability and Innovation Strategy not been advertised in conjunction with the Local Structure Plan?

The Public Realm Design Guidelines, Development Contribution Plan, Private Realm Design Guidelines, Land Assembly Strategy and the Sustainability and Innovation Strategy are currently in the process of development and will be progressed during the finalisation of the Local Structure Plans. It is not unusual for these documents to be progressed post advertising of the Local Structure Plan. This allows for a degree of certainty to be reached within the planning framework and avoids re-working of these documents to account for changes in density and urban structure that may be made post public advertising.


Why has the Development Contribution Plan not been advertised in conjunction with the Local Structure Plan?

The Development Contributions Plan (DCP) requires certainty with regard to infrastructure items and the broader planning framework. As the Local Structure Plan is in a draft format, the DCP does not have definitive infrastructure items or cost estimates. The DCP for the Local Structure Plan will also require input from the Transit Oriented Development Precinct for infrastructure, development yield and cost apportionment purposes.

It is not unusual for a DCP to be progressed post advertising of the Local Structure Plan. This allows for a degree of certainty to be reached within the planning framework and avoids re-working key elements of the DCP to account for changes that may be made post public advertising.


Why does the ‘Transit Oriented Development Connector Boulevard’ have a bend in it?

The first stretch of the Transit Oriented Development (TOD) Boulevard going west from Roe Highway is aligned to have minimal impact on the Environmental Conservation areas required by State Government environmental agencies and also enables an efficient layout of land for future development/subdivision. This stretch of road terminates at the Town Park, creating a high amenity traffic environment and visually aesthetic sightlines, which will provide a delineation between the residential area from the TOD, community centre and potential Activity Centre. The road will influence traffic to slow down as it enters/leaves the TOD, community centre and potential Activity Centre locations which will principally be pedestrian oriented environments.


Why has the Activity Centre not been included in the Residential Precinct Local Structure Plan?

The current State Government under the direction of the Minster of Transport, Planning and Lands, Ms Saffioti have decided to revisit the train station carpark and is exploring the option for a multi-storey carpark with the potential for commercial opportunities. The State Government is currently undertaking further investigations to explore these opportunities, which impacts on the potential location and scale of the Activity Centre.


When will the Local Structure Plan be finalised?

The project team is working towards the completion of local structure plans (and supporting technical documents) by the end of 2018. Indicative timeframes are shown in the diagram below.

These dates are indicative only, and may need to change as the project progresses. In particular, resolving environmental and engineering issues can take a long time in consultation with the relevant State Government Departments. The Transit Oriented Development Precinct is dependent on the timing of the State Government outputs. 


Who is involved in the project?

The City of Kalamunda is managing the project. The City appointed Element (previously TPG+Place Match) in February 2017 and an expert consultant team to prepare the local structure plans, supporting technical documents and the developer contribution plan. The key State Government Agencies and industry bodies involved in the project include:

  • the Department of Planning, Lands and Heritage;
  • the Public Transport Authority;
  • the Department of Transport;
  • Main Roads Western Australia;
  • the Freight and Logistics Council of WA;
  • the Department of Biodiversity, Conservation and Attractions;
  • the Office of the Environmental Protection Authority;
  • the Department of Education; and
  • the Department of Water and Environmental Regulation.

Landowners, the community and other interested parties will be invited to get involved throughout the project.


Is the City working with any developers who want to purchase land in the area?

No. Any developers interested in the Forrestfield North area will be engaged like any other interested purchaser and operate independently of the City.


Where can you get information on the project?

Documentation and information of the project can be found here.

How can I get involved in the project?

·  Join the mailing list for project updates

·  Complete the survey at engage.kalamunda.wa.gov.au or obtain a copy from the City of Kalamunda Administration building or your local library

·  Attend one of the following Forrestfield North Information Sessions:

o  21st May 2018, 5-6pm, High Wycombe Library

o  23st May 2018, 5-6pm, High Wycombe Library

·  Attend one of the following community workshops:

o  3th June 2018, 5-6:30pm at the High Wycombe Recreation Centre

o  18th June 2018, 5-6:30pm at the Woodlupine Community Centre

·  Write a submission to the City of Kalamunda on the draft Residential Precinct Local Structure Plan.


Who can I contact if I have further questions?

Please contact the City of Kalamunda Planning Services during office hours on 9257 9999 or email enquiries@kalamunda.wa.gov.au.


How can I have my say on the Draft Local Structure Plan?

Complete a survey online at engage.kalamunda.wa.gov.au or pick up a hard copy from the City of Kalamunda Administration building (2 Railway Road, Kalamunda).

Write a submission and send via email to enquiries@kalamunda.wa.gov.au or post PO Box 42, Kalamunda WA 6926. 

Technical Questions

What is a Transit Oriented Development (TOD)?

A local structure plan deals with residential density, subdivision, and the coordination of infrastructure at a neighbourhood scale. They generally relate to smaller areas than district structure plans and establish a more detailed vision and planning framework for future subdivision and development. They outline future intentions for specific land uses and density codings, public open space requirements, road network requirements and various other infrastructure items.

The local structure plan (and drafted supporting technical documents) for the Forrestfield North Residential Precinct are currently being advertised for public comment.

What is a District Structure Plan?

Generally, a district structure plan addresses, at a high level, the various elements required to identify the opportunities and constraints of a potential development area. District structure plans broadly outline the major elements for the future development of substantial land areas, including major roads, open space, commercial and industrial areas, and details of environmental factors that require further consideration. A district structure plan can provide a basis for the zoning of land and lead to more detailed structure planning through the preparation of local structure plans that generally apply to a smaller defined land area.

What is a Local Structure Plan?

A local structure plan deals with residential density, subdivision, and the coordination of infrastructure at a neighbourhood scale. They generally relate to smaller areas than district structure plans and establish a more detailed vision and planning framework for future subdivision and development. They outline future intentions for specific land uses and density codings, public open space requirements, road network requirements and various other infrastructure items.

The local structure plan (and drafted supporting technical documents) for the Forrestfield North Residential Precinct are currently being advertised for public comment.


What is a Development Contribution Plan (DCP)?

When people develop land, it can contribute to the need for new or upgraded infrastructure. A Development Contributions Plan (DCP) is used to collect payments towards the provision of infrastructure triggered by the new development.

The payments received assist with the cost of providing roads, drainage, open space and community infrastructure required to accommodate the needs of a growing population.


What other supporting technical documents are included?

As well as the local structure plan for the residential precinct, the following technical documents are included or in the process of development.

  • Design Guidelines (Private Realm) – setting out detailed requirements for the development of privately owned land.
  • Guidelines (Public Realm) – setting out development requirements for publicly owned and controlled land including future roads, streets and parks.
  • Implementation and Land Assembly Strategy – to facilitate the future subdivision and development of the area.
  • Environmental Assessment and Management Strategy (including Ethnographic and Noise and Vibration Assessments) – to identify and appropriately manage the existing environmental and cultural heritage assets in the area.
  • Local Water Management Strategy – setting out how scheme water, stormwater, surface water and ground water will be use and managed in the area.
  • Traffic and Transport Management Strategy – setting out how the transport network will function for the area including efficient public transport services and pedestrian and cyclist facilities for future residents and visitors.
  • Economic, Employment and Retail Strategy – setting out the strategic direction for economic and employment growth and detailed guidance on the type and size of commercial uses that can be developed in the area.
  • Community Infrastructure Strategy – setting out facility requirements for the future community in the area including but not limited to parks, libraries and community centres.
  • Bushfire Management Strategy – setting out how bushfire risk will be managed to ensure the safety of the future community in the area.
  • Infrastructure and Servicing Strategy – setting out how future subdivision and development will be provided with essential services such as power, water, sewer, gas and telecommunications infrastructure.
  • Innovation and Sustainability Strategy – ensuring that future development embraces the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development (ESD), maintains biodiversity and reduces its carbon footprint for the benefit of future generations.

What are Design Guidelines (Private Realm)?

The purpose of the design guidelines (private realm) is to enable the development of attractive streetscapes and enhance the amenity of the area. Forrestfield North will be subject to these guidelines to ensure the area is appealing and inviting for future residents and visitors.

The City is currently in the process of preparing a planning policy that outlines specific design requirements for buildings within commercial and mixed use areas as well as other areas identified by the City. The State Government is also in the process of producing an apartment design guideline that will inform the appropriate design of apartments.


What are Public Realm Guidelines?

The purpose of the public realm guidelines is to outline how the quality and design of the public environment will be enhanced. This will include a program for continued improvement (and maintenance) of the amenity, comfort and aesthetic qualities of the area’s public environment, including roads, streets and parks. Well considered designs will provide opportunities for spaces that are adaptable to local cultural activities, and public park design will allow for future enhancement of the space.


What is an Implementation and Land Assembly Strategy?

Due to the relatively large number of landowners in the area, it is important to understand the priorities and intentions of each resident. The implementation and land assembly strategy will outline which areas might develop before others and will allow us to prioritise infrastructure and stage the planning process.


What is an Environmental Assessment and Management Strategy (including Ethnographic and Noise and Vibration Assessments)?

An environmental assessment and management strategy outlines all the existing natural and historical assets, and assesses how the proposed development might impact on them. This strategy will determine which aspects of potential development are acceptable (and which are not acceptable) from an environmental perspective and will recommend ongoing management where required. The outcomes of this strategy will be enforced through the local structure plan provisions.


What is a Local Water Management Strategy

A local water management strategy is a water management document prepared to support land use planning at the local level. It will be informed by a higher-level district water management strategy prepared as part of the district structure planning process and will demonstrate how the proposed future development of the area will need to address water use and drainage management. For further information please refer to: https://www.planning.wa.gov.au/dop_pub_pdf/Better_Urban_Water_Management.pdf


What is an Economic, Employment and Retail Strategy?

An economic, employment and retail strategy examines the potential for economic and retail development, and employment opportunities within the project area and recommends future economic development and employment generation strategies. Market and demographic analysis will be used to optimise floor space, land use mix, and housing provision to achieve a high level of employment self-efficiency (jobs for locals). This strategy will identify desirable commercial development for the area and provide a comprehensive business attraction plan which will include recommended strategies to attract desirable businesses.


What is a Community Infrastructure Strategy?

A community infrastructure strategy provides direction for the provision of community infrastructure within the project area based on future populations projections and associated profiles. Community infrastructure includes places and spaces that are accessed by the community for: community development, social, cultural, recreation and sporting activities. The strategy will ensure effective and efficient delivery of community infrastructure to ensure that facilities are well utilised, cost efficient and meet the needs of community.


What is a Bushfire Management Strategy?

A bushfire management strategy outlines the fuel management and emergency management strategies (and actions) that will be undertaken to prevent bushfire occurring. It will also outline strategies to manage bushfire (if it does occur) to minimise its impact on people, property, infrastructure and economic activity, and how to maintain and improve resilience of natural ecosystems.


What is an Infrastructure and Servicing Strategy?

An infrastructure and servicing strategy uses population projections and potential dwelling yields to determine future needs and a servicing strategy for how the area will be provided with essential services such as power, water, sewer, gas and telecommunications infrastructure.


What is an Innovation and Sustainability Strategy?

The Forrestfield North project will be a flagship development for the City and for the wider Perth Metropolitan Region. The innovation and sustainability strategy will explore and identify opportunities in urban design, construction, transport, energy, and public spaces to make Forrestfield North the most liveable and attractive development in Perth. It will explore new and emerging technologies and ensure that future development embraces the principles of Ecologically Sustainable Development, maintains biodiversity and reduces its carbon footprint for the benefit of future generations.